Bridge Overview

Bridge Engine is pretty neat. It uses SceneKit to natively render a full 3D scene in mixed reality.

It’s capable of:

  • scanning and building a full 3D mesh of the environment
  • placing 3D markup that reliably sticks in place
  • dropping in objects with full physics that bounce off the real world, for things like placing furniture, or throwing a ball around. 
  • full lighting and casting shadows onto the real world.

And it all runs at a full 60 FPS in stereo on an iPhone.

Bridget

Bridge Engine also powers Bridget, a little open source project that you can jump right into and get started.

OpenBE

Bridget is entirely built from a suite of open source components called OpenBE.  This  includes everything that makes Bridget chirp and dance. OpenBE is designed around a component architecture that are pluggable, to add new behaviours and capabilities to objects. This is where we can build cool new spatial computing capabilities and everyone wins.

Some of the open source components include:

  • Path planning and navigating around obstacles
  • Animation and expressions
  • Spawning new objects in the world
  • Gaze user interface, for picking items on a menu or selecting objects in mixed reality

And more core functionality for handling things like collision sound effects, 3d model loading and other bits.

Bridge Engine for Unity

There's also the Bridge Unity Plugin. You can drag & drop Bridge into an existing Cardboard experience and boom you're upgraded to run with full positional tracking.  You still see the real world obstacles with Collision Avoidance, but for now it's a virtual reality only experience.

Open Source

The OpenBE framework, Bridget sample, and Bridge Unity Plugin are all open source. Once invited to the repo, you can hack on it on Github. Any fixes and improvements are pulled back in by the development team at Occipital.
 
To get started, head over to:
bridge.occipital.com

Watch the video above to see it all in action.


This is a production by Aaron Hilton of Steampunk Digital.   Thanks goes to Occipital for their collaboration and sponsorship of this video.